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Here’s the real ‘container’ store, the new Aether store in the Hayes Valley area of San Francisco. Three stacked containers on a small lot make for an interesting contrast from the surrounding retail. Dry cleaners conveyor stacked vertically makes for an interesting way of displaying retail (if only the staff knew how to operate it). Author Jonathan Littman (10 Faces Of Innovation) pictured standing in doorway.

Here’s the real ‘container’ store, the new Aether store in the Hayes Valley area of San Francisco. Three stacked containers on a small lot make for an interesting contrast from the surrounding retail. Dry cleaners conveyor stacked vertically makes for an interesting way of displaying retail (if only the staff knew how to operate it). Author Jonathan Littman (10 Faces Of Innovation) pictured standing in doorway.

Thinktopia food waste poster designed for United Nations and created by Lorenzo Petrantoni featured in Urban Odyssey magazine in Milan. The poster was inspired by the fact that it takes 1000 gallons of water to make 1 pound of hamburger. Similarly, about 30% of the food we produce goes uneaten. Copy along the bottom reads, “Don’t go to a website. Instead, go into your refrigerator and cupboards and consume the food that’s already there. Heed those ‘use by’ dates, and ask friends to do the same. Because when good food becomes garbage, we lose resources too precious to waste.”

Thinktopia food waste poster designed for United Nations and created by Lorenzo Petrantoni featured in Urban Odyssey magazine in Milan. The poster was inspired by the fact that it takes 1000 gallons of water to make 1 pound of hamburger. Similarly, about 30% of the food we produce goes uneaten. Copy along the bottom reads, “Don’t go to a website. Instead, go into your refrigerator and cupboards and consume the food that’s already there. Heed those ‘use by’ dates, and ask friends to do the same. Because when good food becomes garbage, we lose resources too precious to waste.”

Thinktopia poster by illustrator Gerard Dubois shown featured in Communication Arts Illustration Awards Annual 2013. Photographed at Invisible Spark Studios, Berkeley CA, April 2014

Thinktopia poster by illustrator Gerard Dubois shown featured in Communication Arts Illustration Awards Annual 2013. Photographed at Invisible Spark Studios, Berkeley CA, April 2014

Disruption in Architecture/design.

Disruption in Architecture/design.

Or read one, if you must.

Or read one, if you must.

This Keith Haring in Barcelona was once painted over, but has now been restored.

This Keith Haring in Barcelona was once painted over, but has now been restored.

Olimpia Zagnolia’s brilliant illustration in the Mar7 2014 New York Times, for an article about stress being inherited from the mother. Represented by our friends at Marlena Agency. (No we aren’t being paid for this endorsement, we just use them a lot.)

Olimpia Zagnolia’s brilliant illustration in the Mar7 2014 New York Times, for an article about stress being inherited from the mother. Represented by our friends at Marlena Agency. (No we aren’t being paid for this endorsement, we just use them a lot.)

Magnificent light. Courtesy of johnstoninthestudio

Magnificent light. Courtesy of johnstoninthestudio

Fashion designer and retailer James Perse uses his Bleeker Street NYC front window to promote his public service and political special interests. A few weeks ago, his window sported (and sold) tshirts decrying the use of horse meat in restaurants. This month, it’s about preserving the Mammoth recreational area in California. Perse takes thoughtful stands on what customers care about and (instead of promoting discounts) promotes those real values front and center on his front window. A side effect is that consumer passersby think they’ve spotted an entirely new fashion retailer. But no, it’s just James Perse all over again.

Fashion designer and retailer James Perse uses his Bleeker Street NYC front window to promote his public service and political special interests. A few weeks ago, his window sported (and sold) tshirts decrying the use of horse meat in restaurants. This month, it’s about preserving the Mammoth recreational area in California. Perse takes thoughtful stands on what customers care about and (instead of promoting discounts) promotes those real values front and center on his front window. A side effect is that consumer passersby think they’ve spotted an entirely new fashion retailer. But no, it’s just James Perse all over again.

YouTube Next Lab Gives Thumbs Up To Primal Branding 


“Community is going to happen with you or without you,” says Rachel Lightfoot, senior programming strategist at YouTube Next Lab. “You want to make sure you’re shaping that discussion.”


In order to successfully connect the YouTube community, YouTube ties in their community principles from Primal Branding, written by Thinktopia founder and ceo Patrick Hanlon. 


“Everyone wants to belong,” says Lightfoot, citing Primal Branding as her source. “Everyone wants to find a like-minded group of people who can come together for a common topic or cause.”


Lightfoot explains that big marketers have used a few simple triggers to create brand zealots—people who feel they are a part of their brand community, and advocate (that means buzz) their favorite brands to others. These people are not only focused on the brand, they are the core of the brand.


“What’s great,” says Lightfoot, “is that we see all these principles in all of today’s top YouTube channels.”

YouTube Next Lab Gives Thumbs Up To Primal Branding

“Community is going to happen with you or without you,” says Rachel Lightfoot, senior programming strategist at YouTube Next Lab. “You want to make sure you’re shaping that discussion.”

In order to successfully connect the YouTube community, YouTube ties in their community principles from Primal Branding, written by Thinktopia founder and ceo Patrick Hanlon.

“Everyone wants to belong,” says Lightfoot, citing Primal Branding as her source. “Everyone wants to find a like-minded group of people who can come together for a common topic or cause.”

Lightfoot explains that big marketers have used a few simple triggers to create brand zealots—people who feel they are a part of their brand community, and advocate (that means buzz) their favorite brands to others. These people are not only focused on the brand, they are the core of the brand.

“What’s great,” says Lightfoot, “is that we see all these principles in all of today’s top YouTube channels.”

Here’s the real ‘container’ store, the new Aether store in the Hayes Valley area of San Francisco. Three stacked containers on a small lot make for an interesting contrast from the surrounding retail. Dry cleaners conveyor stacked vertically makes for an interesting way of displaying retail (if only the staff knew how to operate it). Author Jonathan Littman (10 Faces Of Innovation) pictured standing in doorway.

Here’s the real ‘container’ store, the new Aether store in the Hayes Valley area of San Francisco. Three stacked containers on a small lot make for an interesting contrast from the surrounding retail. Dry cleaners conveyor stacked vertically makes for an interesting way of displaying retail (if only the staff knew how to operate it). Author Jonathan Littman (10 Faces Of Innovation) pictured standing in doorway.

Thinktopia food waste poster designed for United Nations and created by Lorenzo Petrantoni featured in Urban Odyssey magazine in Milan. The poster was inspired by the fact that it takes 1000 gallons of water to make 1 pound of hamburger. Similarly, about 30% of the food we produce goes uneaten. Copy along the bottom reads, “Don’t go to a website. Instead, go into your refrigerator and cupboards and consume the food that’s already there. Heed those ‘use by’ dates, and ask friends to do the same. Because when good food becomes garbage, we lose resources too precious to waste.”

Thinktopia food waste poster designed for United Nations and created by Lorenzo Petrantoni featured in Urban Odyssey magazine in Milan. The poster was inspired by the fact that it takes 1000 gallons of water to make 1 pound of hamburger. Similarly, about 30% of the food we produce goes uneaten. Copy along the bottom reads, “Don’t go to a website. Instead, go into your refrigerator and cupboards and consume the food that’s already there. Heed those ‘use by’ dates, and ask friends to do the same. Because when good food becomes garbage, we lose resources too precious to waste.”

Thinktopia poster by illustrator Gerard Dubois shown featured in Communication Arts Illustration Awards Annual 2013. Photographed at Invisible Spark Studios, Berkeley CA, April 2014

Thinktopia poster by illustrator Gerard Dubois shown featured in Communication Arts Illustration Awards Annual 2013. Photographed at Invisible Spark Studios, Berkeley CA, April 2014

Disruption in Architecture/design.

Disruption in Architecture/design.

Or read one, if you must.

Or read one, if you must.

This Keith Haring in Barcelona was once painted over, but has now been restored.

This Keith Haring in Barcelona was once painted over, but has now been restored.

Olimpia Zagnolia’s brilliant illustration in the Mar7 2014 New York Times, for an article about stress being inherited from the mother. Represented by our friends at Marlena Agency. (No we aren’t being paid for this endorsement, we just use them a lot.)

Olimpia Zagnolia’s brilliant illustration in the Mar7 2014 New York Times, for an article about stress being inherited from the mother. Represented by our friends at Marlena Agency. (No we aren’t being paid for this endorsement, we just use them a lot.)

Magnificent light. Courtesy of johnstoninthestudio

Magnificent light. Courtesy of johnstoninthestudio

The creator’s code.

The creator’s code.

Fashion designer and retailer James Perse uses his Bleeker Street NYC front window to promote his public service and political special interests. A few weeks ago, his window sported (and sold) tshirts decrying the use of horse meat in restaurants. This month, it’s about preserving the Mammoth recreational area in California. Perse takes thoughtful stands on what customers care about and (instead of promoting discounts) promotes those real values front and center on his front window. A side effect is that consumer passersby think they’ve spotted an entirely new fashion retailer. But no, it’s just James Perse all over again.

Fashion designer and retailer James Perse uses his Bleeker Street NYC front window to promote his public service and political special interests. A few weeks ago, his window sported (and sold) tshirts decrying the use of horse meat in restaurants. This month, it’s about preserving the Mammoth recreational area in California. Perse takes thoughtful stands on what customers care about and (instead of promoting discounts) promotes those real values front and center on his front window. A side effect is that consumer passersby think they’ve spotted an entirely new fashion retailer. But no, it’s just James Perse all over again.

YouTube Next Lab Gives Thumbs Up To Primal Branding 


“Community is going to happen with you or without you,” says Rachel Lightfoot, senior programming strategist at YouTube Next Lab. “You want to make sure you’re shaping that discussion.”


In order to successfully connect the YouTube community, YouTube ties in their community principles from Primal Branding, written by Thinktopia founder and ceo Patrick Hanlon. 


“Everyone wants to belong,” says Lightfoot, citing Primal Branding as her source. “Everyone wants to find a like-minded group of people who can come together for a common topic or cause.”


Lightfoot explains that big marketers have used a few simple triggers to create brand zealots—people who feel they are a part of their brand community, and advocate (that means buzz) their favorite brands to others. These people are not only focused on the brand, they are the core of the brand.


“What’s great,” says Lightfoot, “is that we see all these principles in all of today’s top YouTube channels.”

YouTube Next Lab Gives Thumbs Up To Primal Branding

“Community is going to happen with you or without you,” says Rachel Lightfoot, senior programming strategist at YouTube Next Lab. “You want to make sure you’re shaping that discussion.”

In order to successfully connect the YouTube community, YouTube ties in their community principles from Primal Branding, written by Thinktopia founder and ceo Patrick Hanlon.

“Everyone wants to belong,” says Lightfoot, citing Primal Branding as her source. “Everyone wants to find a like-minded group of people who can come together for a common topic or cause.”

Lightfoot explains that big marketers have used a few simple triggers to create brand zealots—people who feel they are a part of their brand community, and advocate (that means buzz) their favorite brands to others. These people are not only focused on the brand, they are the core of the brand.

“What’s great,” says Lightfoot, “is that we see all these principles in all of today’s top YouTube channels.”

About:

Thinktopia® is an idea engineering firm dedicated to creating communities around brands. Based in New York, Minneapolis, Everywhere.

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